ISLPR Language Services Blog

Guidelines for ISLPR Tests: Writing Test

Posted by on Apr 19, 2021 at 10:27 AM

Academic Test:

In the Writing test you will be asked to write about 400 words in total. You will be given 60 minutes to complete the test.

  • There are usually two tasks; occasionally three tasks are given but the total number of words expected will remain the same.
  • The topic, the type of text, the purpose for writing and the audience to whom you are writing will be different for each task.
  • One of the tasks is likely to be a letter or a note. In another task, you will be expected to express your opinion(s).
  • If your test is for entry to a tertiary program, at least one topic will be relevant to the academic discipline or profession you plan to enter (e.g. business or engineering); it is likely to be a report, a personal statement, an essay, an article, or an open letter (e.g. a ‘letter to the editor’)
  • If your test is for entry to a High School program, the topic will be an issue of interest to adolescents; it may be an essay, an article for a school newsletter or magazine, or a project report. You will not be allowed to use a dictionary.

Professional Registration:

You will write two texts, totalling about 400 words, in 60 minutes.

  • At least one of the texts will be directly related to teaching practice.
  • The audience is likely to be students, parents, colleagues or other members of the school community, or officers in the education system.
  • The other task could be a memo, report, essay, article, submission or open letter (e.g. a ‘letter to the editor’ of a newspaper) in which you might be expected to express opinions about education.
  • Dictionary use is not allowed.
  • Generally tasks will relate to the sorts of tasks teachers could be expected to undertake.

Vocational Test:

You will write two texts, totalling about 400 words, in 60 minutes.

  • At least one of the texts will be directly related to your vocational practice.
  • The audience could include members of the general public, an employer, a supervisor, a union or government official, or someone else you might communicate with in your vocational role(s).
  • The other task will be a memo, report, article, submission or open letter (e.g. a ‘letter to the editor’ of a newspaper) in which you might be expected to express opinions or ideas relevant to your vocation.
  • Dictionary use is not allowed.

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