About the Test

I found if you have some tricks and some fortune, you can pass other tests. ISLPR is different; you have to be good to get the score you need. For ISLPR you just have to improve your English. With other tests you don’t have to understand the texts; you just have to attempt to answer the questions…”

The ISLPR tests all 4 macros skills over approximately 2 hours:

  • Speaking, Listening and Reading abilities are tested through a one-to-one 60 minute interview
  • You then have approximately 60 minutes to complete the writing tasks.

Part tests (e.g. just a Writing test) are also offered, but you must check with the University or registration board if they will accept a part-test.

The Content:

  • Tasks reflect real-life language use
  • An important principle is that the test should give a direct indication of the candidate’s ability to use English for practical purposes.
  • Tasks are designed to reflect real-life language use.

The interview:

  • begins with a conversation about everyday topics and the particular areas of need or interest of the candidate.
  • In the second part of the interview, there are Listening and Reading tasks in which candidates are asked questions about authentic texts such as news stories and public announcements and give spoken answers (generally using their own words to prove that they have understood the texts).
  • Throughout the interview, the candidate’s fluency, range of language and appropriateness of language as well as the accuracy of their grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation are important.

Writing tasks reflect the kinds of writing that candidates do in their daily lives.

The Results:

  • Test results are reported as a profile, e.g. S:2, L:2+, R:2+, W:2.
  • Brief summaries of each of the levels of the scale, is given on the page ‘Why use ISLPR – Summary of ISLPR’.